It’s called Tapetum Lucidum, and it’s what provides animals with the rockstar dream capability of night vision. But then like out of another awesome X-men movie, came along this little Chinese super talent. Nong Youhui was just a young boy when he was first studied by doctors in Southern China for having “cat like” eyes, not to mention the ability to see in the dark. Nong’s friends and family say that not only does he see better at night. But, sometimes the boy gets blurred vision as a result of direct sunlight. After several medical tests, it was confirmed that the boy could read and write perfectly in complete darkness. Is Nong a living example of a genetic mutation in humans? Could we really be witnessing human evolution right before our eyes? Well, not exactly. Evolutionists would point to evolutionary history dating back to the beginning of mankind claiming that there has never been a need for humans to have this visual superpower. Most of us are active during the day and sleep at night. Experts claim that IF this were to ever happen in humans, there would almost certainly have to be a family history of the unique traits, and genetic evidence of the development of a mutation. Therefore, it would be impossible for a human to develop this in a single generation.

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James Reynolds, Pediatric ophthalmologist says:

Furthermore, there is no single genetic mutation that could produce a fully formed and functioning tapetum lucidum, Reynolds explained; such an ability would require multiple mutations, which wouldn’t occur all at once. Evolution happens incrementally, he said, not by leaps and bounds. “Evolutionarily, mutations can result in differences that allow for new environmental niche exploitation. But such mutations are modified over long periods. A functional tapetum in a human would be just as absurd as a human born with wings. It can’t happen.”


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Cats, sharks, marsupials, alligators and other predatory animals have this ability so that they can augment the light at night just enough to hunt down, kill and devour their prey at night. So unless you are a bad ass member of the superhero team of the Marvel Universe or decide to devote hundreds of years of family dedication transforming into “night owls,” humans will likely never have tapetum lucidum. This is likely a case of a rare genetic gift with resembling traits, unexplainable to pragmatics or those relying on empirical evidence alone.
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